Begin anytime throughout the year - FALL CLASSES BEGIN AUGUST 28
Our curriculum is based on the USAG Jr. Olympic Program designed to provide a noncompetitive, achievement-oriented
program of progressive skills, conditioning and flexibility, which includes all gymnastics equipment.
PRINT HERE TO PRINT 2017-18 REGISTRATION FORM
Boys Recreational Classes Age 5 & up
Floor Exercise, Pommel Horse, Still Rings, Vault, Parallel Bars, Horizontal Bar   

DESCRIPTION OF EVENTS AS QUOTED FROM USA GYMNASTICS

Floor Exercise
Floor routines consist of dynamic tumbling skills.  The best gymnasts will incorporate tumbling passes with multiple twisting and flipping, both forward and backward,
throughout their routine.  A gymnast must show power and control on this event.  

Pommel Horse
Considered by many to be the most difficult of all men's events, the pommel horse is also the most subtle.  Each move is defined by complex hand placements.  The
gymnast must perform continuous circular movements interrupted only by the required scissors elements.  The entire exercise should flow with controlled rhythm.  A
gymnast must show precise timing and balance throughout the routine.

Still Rings
Of all the men's events, rings are the least stable, therefore requiring the greatest amount of strength.  Just as its name suggests, the rings must be kept still while the
gymnast is performing.  There are two types of moves on the rings-strength positions and swinging movements.  Those with the best command of the event will display
extraordinary skill in arriving at all holds with absolute precision.

Vault
Each vault is categorized in the Code of Points, the official text giving the relevant value of each skill performed.  A good vault is sometimes described as the "big"
vault.   The height, the distance of travel, the overall acceleration into the vault and the sudden impact of a no-step, "stuck" landing all create a good impression for the
judges.

Parallel Bars
A parallel bar routine consists of predominantly swing and flight elements.  Watch for the gymnast to execute swing elements and skills in which both hands release and
regrasp the bars.  Some gymnasts move outside the two rails, performing handstands and kips on only one bar.

Horizontal Bar
This event is also known as the high bar, and routines consist exclusively of swinging parts without stops.  The parts are generally called giant swings, with more
specific terms applying to changes in grip, direction and body position.  Watch for the gymnast to execute release moves.  Look for high-flying dismounts with multiple
flips  and twists and, of course, the gymnast aims to land the dismount with no extra steps.
Twinkle Star Classes Ages 1-5
2017-18 FALL GYMNASTICS SCHEDULE
Girls Recreational Classes Age 5 & Up
Vault, Uneven Bars, Balance Beam, Floor Exercise    

DESCRIPTION OF EVENTS AS QUOTED FROM USA GYMNASTICS

VAULT
A successful vault begins with a strong, accelerated run.  The best vaulters explode off the board with tremendous quickness during the preflight phase of the vault.  
When the gymnast pushes off the vault table, the judges are looking for proper body position and an instantaneous repulsion.  Watch for the height and distance
traveled, as well as the number of flips and twists.  Gymnasts strive to "stick" their landings by taking no extra steps.  
 

UNEVEN BARS
The most spectacular of the women's events, the uneven bars demands strength, as well as concentration, courage, coordination and split-second timing.  Watch for the
big swings that begin in handstands on the high bar, incorporating multiple hand changes, pirouettes and release elements.  The entire routine should flow from one skill
to the next without pauses, extra swings or additional supports.  Watch for the high flying dismount where the gymnast will attempt to stick her landing.

BALANCE BEAM
The beam is only four inches wide and considered the most difficult event by many gymnasts.  The gymnast must use acrobatic, tumbling and dance movements in her
routine.  Watch for acrobatic series consisting of two or more elements performed in a row.   The overall execution should give the impression that the gymnast is
performing on the floor, not on a beam.  Watch for variations in rhythm, changes in level, and the harmonious blend of dance and acrobatic elements.

FLOOR EXERCISE
Usually a favorite event for the fans, the floor routine must be choreographed to music and cover the entire floor area.  The gymnast must use a variety of dance and
tumbling elements which reflects her personality.  Most gymnast at the international level will do four tumbling passes, changing both the direction and level of movement
throughout the routine.  Watch for powerful, yet graceful, routines that are fun and exciting.